Save $10 off $199 | $25 off $499 | $50 off $999 using the code SPRINGSAVE at checkout. Excludes orders containing MAP items.
FCP Euro Spring Sale

If you start noticing a wobble during acceleration, and you have already ruled out alignment and wheel balancing, there is a chance that the lower control arm bushings may be shot.

With the control arms always under stress, it's only a matter of time before the bushings start to crack. There are many options for upgraded bushing, but a shop press may be required to properly get them fitted. If you are only looking to restore the factory handling, it is easier to simply swap the entire control arm with replacements from FCP Euro.

Necessary Tools:

  • Jack and jack stands
  • Torque wrench and necessary tools to remove your front wheels.
  • 15mm, 18mm, and 21mm crescent wrenches
  • 10mm, 14mm, 15mm, 18mm, and 21mm socket wrenches
  • Various sizes of allen keys and screw drivers
  • Rubber and metal mallet

     

    The front lower control arm consists of three main points. The rear bushing, the front bushing, and the ball joint.

    Removing Lower Control Arms:

    1. First, remove the wheel and safely rest the vehicle on jack stands.
    If the vehicle is equipped with self leveling headlights, you will need to disconnect the sensor from the passenger side control arm. A 10mm bolt holds the plastic lever to the body of the arm.

    2. Remove the 18mm bolt from the front bushing. On the passenger side of the vehicle, this may require a flat crescent wrench because of limited spacer from oil lines.

    3. Remove the two 14mm bolts which hold the rear bushing to the car.

    4. Remove the ball joint nut; the bolt has an allen key hole on the top, which may be necessary if the nut is seized to the bolt. On my S40, the nut required a 21mm wrench. However, some P1 Volvos came equipped with a 19mm nut.

    A ball joint separator tool will make removal of the ball joint nearly effortless.

    However, if you do not have the tool or you cannot get the ball joint bolt to slide out, I suggest disconnecting the steering tie rod and pulling the axle out of the hub. This will provide you with sufficient room to hit the bolt with a metal mallet, which should pop it right out.

    If you cannot get the ball joint bolt to slide out, I suggest disconnecting the steering tie rod and pulling the axle out of the hub. This will provide you with sufficient room to hit the bolt with a metal mallet, which should pop it right out.

    The following instructions are for freeing the axle from the hub:

    5. Remove the axle bolt from the center of the hub.

    6. Disconnect the steering tie rod by removing the 15mm nut, an allen key may be necessary to prevent the bolt from turning. If the tie rod does not slide out of place, tap it with the rubber mallet a few times. Avoid using a metal mallet, as this may damage or bend the tie rod ends.

    7. With the tie rod disconnected, you can rotate the hub assembly to slide the axle out of the hub. This will provide easy access to the control arm bolt.

    To install the new control arm, simply follow these instructions in reverse order. Depending on how firm the new bushings are, you may need to place a jack under the control arm to help line up the bolt holes.

    As with any suspension modification or upgrade, I strongly encourage having your alignment checked as soon as possible. Especially if the old bushings were worn or cracked, they may have allowed enough play for the car to wobble itself out of alignment.


author image
Written by :
Michael Hallock

Michael lives in Dahlonega, GA where he works full time as manager of an accounts receivable department. Despite a bachelors in New Media Arts, his true passion is in modifying and maintaining the cars that he and his wife own; Volvo for life. Many in the Volvo community might recognize his screen name, MyNameIdeasWereTaken.


More Related Articles

Volvo P1, P2, P3, & SPA Platforms Explained
Mercedes-Benz Chassis Codes Explained
FCP Euro Spring Sale
How To Determine Volvo Brake Rotor Sizes
How to Fix An Intermittent Volvo A/C (Volvo P1)
BMW VIN Decoder for the 1600, 2002, 2002tii
Join Us For Cars & Coffee On July 29th!
Here's Why Volvos Are Considered Safe
© FCP Euro 2024. All rights reserved.  
Version: 2dfdad1fd